First Ever “Presidential Alert” coming to your Phone on October 3rd, 2018

WESSomething unprecedented is about to happen on your phone soon. Here’s what you need to know…

You’re probably familiar with Amber Alerts about missing children on your phone, but have you ever heard of WEA alerts?

What does WEA stand for?

WEA stands for Wireless Emergency Alert and it’s part of our nation’s broader Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS), which also includes the familiar Emergency Alert System (EAS).

The EAS is what you see and experience when your TV or radio broadcast is interrupted for about a minute with a monthly test.

What distinguishes a WEA alert from the EAS alert? Read the rest of this entry »

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Is Coconut Oil a “Healthy Food”

spela Andolsek
(freeimages.com)

According to a recent survey, 72% of Americans classify coconut oil as a “healthy food.”

Here’s what the science says.

What you need to know about coconut oil.

A 2017 American Heart Association panel reviewed the evidence on which fats in foods raise—and which lower—the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The experts’ findings: “We conclude strongly that lowering intake of saturated fat and replacing it with unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fats, will lower the incidence of CVD.” Yet many people have heard that saturated fats are harmless. Read the rest of this entry »


Is Drinking Seltzer Water Bad for your Teeth?

(worldartsme.com)

Is your seltzer habit harming your teeth?

Sparkling water has all the bubbly and none of the sugar of soda. But is there a downside?

Sparkling water is made by pumping carbon dioxide into water,” explains John Ruby, a retired professor of pediatric dentistry at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. “The CO2turns into carbonic acid, and the pH drops.”

A lower pH means that the liquid has become more acidic. (Pure water has a neutral pH of 7 on the 0-to-14 pH scale.)

Acids can erode tooth enamel. And “once you lose enamel, you never get it back,” says Ruby. That can lead to sensitivity, discoloration, and loss of tooth structure. Read the rest of this entry »


Why do Drugs have Crazy Names?

Adrian Baciu (freeimages.com)

Everyone agrees that drug names are becoming ever more crazy. For instance, why all those X’s and Z’s in brand names (Pradaxa, Xarelto, Xeljanz, Zyprexa)?

Generic names can be even more mouth-boggling. Can you remember that acetaminophen is the generic name for Tylenol, and can you pronounce it? If you want to get it when visiting Europe, however, you’ll have to ask for paracetamol. Both of those names get their syllables from a chemical name of the compound: para-acetylaminophenol.

But the names of most generics (like brand names) are largely or completely made up and illogical, except that some related drugs share a suffix, such as “-statin” at the end of cholesterol-lowering drugs like simvastatin (Lipitor) or rosuvastatin (Crestor), and “-azepam” for tranquilizers like lorazepam (Ativan) or temazepam (Restoril).

Tongue-twisting generic names are a big problem since the vast majority of drugs are now dispensed as generics, leading to growing concerns that if names are mispronounced or misread and drugs misidentified, patients could be harmed. Avoiding such confusions is one of the rationales for electronic prescriptions. Read the rest of this entry »


Rosie the “Riverter” was not Rosie

The Riveting Story of an American Icon

Rosie has a surprising history

You may know the woman depicted here as Rosie the Riveter,

but she wasn’t originally called that.

Read the rest of this entry »


Happy 50th Birthday to the Microwave

(www.freeimages.com)

The home microwave oven turned 50 in 2017. Here are some tidbits you may not know about this cooking contraption—now found in more than 90 percent of American homes—gleaned from an article written by an associate professor of radiation medicine at Georgetown University and other sources:

 

Read the rest of this entry »


FDA WARNING: If you’re 40 or older, eating too much black licorice can send you to the hospital

As it turns out, you really can overdose on candy—or, more precisely, black licorice.

Days before the biggest candy eating holiday of the year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) encourages moderation if you enjoy snacking on the old fashioned favorite.

So, if you’re getting your stash ready for Halloween, here’s some advice from FDA:

Read the rest of this entry »